"We’ve been taught a woman’s body will cause men to sin. We’re told that if a woman shows too much of her body men will do stupid things. Let’s be clear: A woman’s body is not dangerous to you. Her body will not cause you harm. It will not make you do stupid things. If you do stupid things, it is because you chose to do stupid things."

How to See a Woman: A Conversation Between a Father and Son (via rickonstarrk)

(Source: girlbreakout, via lyshaeskro)

justinbryannelson:

This is the first iPhone 5 case I’m giving away!!
All you have to do is reblog this post to be entered into the contest!
I’ll pick a winner tomorrow at noon!
Thanks to gelaskins!!

justinbryannelson:

This is the first iPhone 5 case I’m giving away!!

All you have to do is reblog this post to be entered into the contest!

I’ll pick a winner tomorrow at noon!

Thanks to gelaskins!!

theatlantic:

'Design Is One of the Most Powerful Forces in Our Lives'

“Do you ring a doorbell with a finger or a thumb?” That’s the kind of question Alice Rawsthorn, design critic for The International New York Times, asks when she thinks about design—all design—and the major role designers have in altering our lives.
Her answer, however, reveals a lot about how she thinks of design’s evolution. “The older you are, the likelier you will be to press it with a finger, probably your index finger,” she writes in her latest book of essays, Hello World: Where Design Meets Life. “If you are younger, you may well use a thumb, because it will have been exercised so thoroughly by typing text messages and gunning down digital assailants on game consoles that it is likely to be stronger and nimbler than any of your fingers.”
Rawsthorn cites this and other mundane behavior to show how technology has impacted design and how graphic, product, and interactive design are key in almost everything we experience today. It’s no wonder, then, that when Rawsthorn speaks, people who care about design’s influences listen.
Read more. [Image: Colin Jagoe]

theatlantic:

'Design Is One of the Most Powerful Forces in Our Lives'

“Do you ring a doorbell with a finger or a thumb?” That’s the kind of question Alice Rawsthorn, design critic for The International New York Times, asks when she thinks about design—all design—and the major role designers have in altering our lives.

Her answer, however, reveals a lot about how she thinks of design’s evolution. “The older you are, the likelier you will be to press it with a finger, probably your index finger,” she writes in her latest book of essays, Hello World: Where Design Meets Life. “If you are younger, you may well use a thumb, because it will have been exercised so thoroughly by typing text messages and gunning down digital assailants on game consoles that it is likely to be stronger and nimbler than any of your fingers.”

Rawsthorn cites this and other mundane behavior to show how technology has impacted design and how graphic, product, and interactive design are key in almost everything we experience today. It’s no wonder, then, that when Rawsthorn speaks, people who care about design’s influences listen.

Read more. [Image: Colin Jagoe]

Psalm 3:5

Psalm 3:5

"Here’s a general rule. When an insult is directed at a woman, consider how it would have sounded directed at a man. If the result is ridiculous, then it’s probably sexist."

came across this great comment on an article Ruby Tandoh (Great British Bake Off Runner Up) wrote for The Guardian (via ismisesarah)

(via brittanickel)

She Did Not Suffer Much
The result of doodles on the back of an envelope and the words of Betty Smith from A Tree Grows in Brooklyn. 

She Did Not Suffer Much

The result of doodles on the back of an envelope and the words of Betty Smith from A Tree Grows in Brooklyn. 

"Men are taught to apologize for their weaknesses, women for their strengths."

— Lois Wyse, author and advertising executive (via nicothedoctor) (via sexxxisbeautiful)

(Source: taste-with-your-fingers, via moonandtrees)

Not amused.

Not amused.

"It is ‘beautiful’ because it is just right."

— Design as Art—Bruno Munari (via belafrank)

(Source: belafrank)